The Brown & Black

Let’s be real – Krit really came to America to study black people…

This is the general consensus amongst my friends.  Are they lying?  Prolly not.  In the spirit of Black History Month, I’ve decided to try and articulate my I’m-still-not-even-sure-what-to-call-it with black people starting with a recap I wrote in 2010 of one of my favourite weekends!  Spelhouse [Spelman and Morehouse] Homecoming.  It took place when I first moved to the east coast…

—–

Pow

School Daze

My all time favourite show of all time is “The Cosby Show” and so I knew a little bit about Historically Black Colleges and Universities [HBCUs] since Dr Huxtable went to Hillman College [as did my boo Denise, which is the setting for “A Different World”].  Hillman’s fictional but they often used shots of Spelman to portray its campus.  My close friend and classmate Ryan Glover [her uncle is Danny Glover from “Lethal Weapon” – well that’s what I tell everyone anyway] went to Spelman so I jumped at the chance to head down to Atlanta for homecoming.

Moorehouse Alum - Martin Luther King Jr

Morehouse Alum – Dr Martin Luther King Jr

Highlights

The Gold Room – I kept calling it the Gold Tooth.  It was like Pig Pen to the tenth power and I loved it.

Gold Room

Gold Room

Pow

Pow

The Hotel – Checking in on Thursday, there was a dodgy stain on one of the comforters so we got on to housekeeping.  I’ve never heard of a black light service but apparently it’s on offer these days.  On Friday I sat down in the lobby next to Allen Iverson.  I had no idea until Ryan asked me “do you know who that is?”  I turned my head and whispered back “is that Omarion?”  Saturday was supposed to be a relatively quiet night but instead there was a shootout and a crazy lady in the business centre telling me the code for the cure for cancer.

Ryan & Krit Before The Shootout

Ryan & Krit Ordering Pizza Before The Shootout

Market Friday – Greeks.  Strolling.  Stepping.  Stalls.  Food.

Greeks

Greeks

The W – Mental.  There had to be at least a couple of thousand people tryna get into this party and there was absolutely no structure in place.  The promoters had their money from ticket sales so they weren’t too fussed about anything else.  They had us all just standing there on an incline, getting squashed and heated.  Some people woulda been there over an hour.  You could feel the tension.  All it would take is one person to say the wrong thing or nudge someone by accident and people would start losing eyeballs and other delicate body parts.

TENSION

TENSION

Looking up, hotel guests had their families on couches pushed up against the windows so they could gawk.  Ryan was like “they’re prolly telling their children that this is what you call a social experiment”.  I started laughing but Ryan warned me to be ready.  Ready for what?  Well, not even a minute later, the crowd snapped and everyone was bumrushing the doors.  It was like the stampede in “Jumanji”.  I felt sorry for this one girl who tripped and fell down.  She woulda got trampled on by about 100 pairs of pumps – that could kill you.  Another girl was screaming about how she only had one shoe on, there was no way she was getting the other one back that night.  As we got closer to the entrance we caught a glimpse of the promoters packing up and running away while the bouncers had panicked looks on their faces.  We got in just in time before the cops shut the doors on a few hundred people who prolly paid for their tickets but now had no way of getting in.  I was good though.  I was running on adrenaline at that point and I was in love with the DJ who was in tune with my iPod.

Krit & Ryan @ The W

Krit & Ryan @ The W

We ended up in another function too where Jazze Pha popped up in rosary beads.  I called him out cuz I know he’s not Catholic.

Jazze Pha

Jazze Pha

Jazze Pha & Krit

Jazze Pha & Krit

Wafflehouse – I thought the Denny’s in Porirua on a Friday night was an experience but watching a statetrooper make an arrest while you pour banana syrup on your pecan waffle is something else.

The Waffle House Experience

The Waffle House Experience

Tailgating – There were thousands of people there and the majority had no interest in the football game.  The atmosphere was awesome.  You had alumni from 30 years ago jamming with their graduating class and if you took a few steps in any direction you’d find other generations right up to current undergraduates doing the same thing.

The Game!

The Game!

Tailgating

Tailgating

We walked around and around in what felt like a fashion show with everyone dressed to the nines [you would think half the girls were at the club].  I was impressed by the guy wearing a fur Eskimo hat when it was 25 degrees Celsius out.

Hat With The Fur

Hat With The Fur

Ryan kept yelling out “there goes Yo Gabba Gabba!” at the lady in the orange jumpsuit while I had fans of my own taking photos and hollering at me for my “Who Gon’ Check Me, Boo?” shirt [quoted from “Real Housewives Of Atlanta”].  I got mauled a couple of times but the worst encounter was the 40 year old lady in pink who apprehended me.  She grabbed a hold of my wrist, talking about “I’M CHECKING YOU, BOO” with that glazed over drunk look.  That’s when I called for help.

Who Gon' Check Me, Boo?

Before Getting Checked

Universities don’t have homecoming where I’m from and students definitely don’t have the same sense of school pride like they do here.  You can’t walk anywhere on this campus without seeing someone rocking the Lehigh brand and it was the same at Spelman and Morehouse with their gear.  In New Zealand, you’ll be lucky to find three people in a week wearing university apparel.  It’s a nice change.  Anyway, after a 12 hour sleep, the first thing I did when I got back was watch “School Daze” and a few of the first episodes of “A Different World”.  I really thought I was Dwayne Wayne.

—–

END RECAP

As you can see my initial connection to blackness is quite superficial.  Growing up, I’ve always been drawn to black recording artists, actors and athletes [the only real platform we’re exposed to blacks in New Zealand is entertainment since we have no sizable population here].  Attitude, presence, music, humour, energy – I was infatuated.  The posters in my room were of TLC, Michael Jackson, Janet Jackson, Prince and Bobby Brown and there’s nothing about them I didn’t know.  If you know me, you know that when I go hard for an artist I don’t play around.

Old Room Walls Featuring Bobby Brown, "The Lion King" & The Roots

Old Room Featuring Bobby, “The Lion King” & The Roots

Prince & Krit

Prince & Krit [NYC]

Prince [NYC]

Prince [NYC]

A Tribe Called Quest [NYC]

A Tribe Called Quest [NYC]

Krit & Flav

Krit & Flav [Vegas]

Krit & LisaRaye [Atlanta]

Krit & LisaRaye [Atlanta]

Krit With TLC [Tokyo]

Krit With TLC [Tokyo]

My appreciation didn’t really grow beyond that until I was 16 in my history class.  We covered Black Civil Rights and I blitzed everyone on every assignment.  I couldn’t get enough.  I became hooked to the point where it was even printed in my yearbook profile.

IC: Intended Career / PC: Probable Career

IC: Intended Career / PC: Probable Career Law School/Poker Were Realities Even Then

While I loved what I learned, we barely scratched the surface.  I didn’t quite know how to relate it to my world at that stage of my life [and there weren’t really any other opportunities to take further classes anyway] so my connection/comprehension reached another plateau.  All that changed when I started at Lehigh.

Pow!

Pow!

While I didn’t specifically set out to make black friends, it was only natural that I fell in with the ‘students of color’ because that’s just how it goes.  I’m comfortable socialising/making friends with Ws but you put me in a room where they’re the majority and I’ll automatically gravitate to the other brown faces.  Of course this meant I was in my element – I finally had black friends!

Kester, Shalena, Ryan, Greg & Krit

Kester, Shalena, Ryan, Greg & Krit

Now I want it to be clear that I don’t think I’m black nor do I fetishise blacks.  I’m very proud of my Samoan heritage.  I embrace my culture and wear it proudly – it just so happens that I identify with another.  Before I mentioned my affinity to blackness primarily through entertainment but through my new relationships, it became so much more.

Black History Month 2011 [Washington DC]

Black History Month 2012 [DC]

Black History Month 2012 [Washington DC]

Black History Month 2012 [DC]

Krit, Kester & Tone [Atlanta]

Krit, Kester & Tone @ The MLK Jr Museum [Atlanta]

It started with my classes at the College of Education.  We would have brief discussions about institutionalised racism in the US and how it’s still very much prevalent and why.  I’d later mull it over with my classmates whose parents/grandparents went to legally segregated schools and they described how schools are still segregated to this day but without the label.  It opened my eyes as to just how segregated schools in New Zealand are.  From there, all the other parallels started clicking.  I was never naive to think racism didn’t exist in New Zealand – I just didn’t recognise the extent.  You have to understand that there’s no real consciousness of it here.  You’ll have certain events come up in the media from time to time but they get written off as isolated incidents.  It’s as if the whole country is oblivious and/or in denial, including Pacific people.

Ryan Hosting The Hip Hop Education Panel

Ryan Hosting The Hip Hop Education Panel

Lehigh offered Africana Studies which was outside of my grad programme’s core courses but I pleaded with my academic advisor to let me take one and she agreed.  It turned out to be my favourite class EVER so I audited three more Africana Studies courses despite them not counting towards my degree.

Photography Assignment - Statement Of Lehigh's Cultural Climate

Photo Assignment – Statement Of Lehigh’s Cultural Climate

Through my classes and my friends, I’ve been able to view my life as a young Pacific male in New Zealand through the lens/theories of another marginalised group.  It made me reflect on my journey as well as my family’s and everything started to add up.  The most important person in my life is my Mum and so while I was processing all these new notions, I would always think of her and her story.

Mum & Grandma

Mum & Grandma [Early 1950s]

To come from Samoa to a predominantly white country as an infant and have it drummed into your head to assimilate and aspire to marry into a white family would give you all kinds of complexes.  My Mum’s quite polished, slim, fine featured and considered ‘light-skinned’ [see Claire Huxtable] – she easily could’ve gone down the road of becoming a trophy wife but she didn’t.  She moved away from her family in Auckland, met my Dad who was educated but fobby to the DEF [out of her 8 siblings, she was the only one to marry a Samoan] and they raised us in Porirua where we were in the thick of Maoris and islanders.  Given the generational social norms of the time, it wasn’t quite her parents’ ideal situation but my Mum was comfortable and confident in her own skin.  She passed that on to us – over the years there have been people [including my own relatives] who would try to make me feel like I was less for not being half-caste and for coming from the hood but I never did.  I used to wonder where I got my free spirit from and now I know more than ever that it was from my Mum and I admire her for forging the path she did.

Dad, Leini, Miki & Mum

Dad, Leini, Miki & Mum

Watching my Mum fight her whole life, namely in her workplace of government departments, I didn’t quite understand the systemic abuse she was up against but coming back, learning what I’ve learned, we often have conversations about it and other obstacles and challenges our people face.  It’s refreshing for us both.  There’s ample amounts of black literature out there explaining all the issues compacted in the lives of people like my Mum all the way down to me but you’ll be hard pressed to find the same resources for Pacific.

Mum Having A Laugh With The Students @ Krit's Expense [Ohio]

Mum Having A Laugh With The Students @ Krit’s Expense [Ohio]

I touched on my shared and familiar experience of racism in the US and New Zealand last year in an entry I wrote while I was quite shaken.  It didn’t capture how much I celebrated my other shared and familiar experiences with blackness!  Being so far from home and being the only Samoan within 100 miles, I quickly felt a strong sense of community and inclusion from my friends ‘of color’ where I could really express who I was without judgment.  It enabled me to engage in all kinds of conversations and navigate certain spaces I was never able to before.  I found a true connection that was no longer from mere observance and with that I flourished.  I got involved in everything from writing for the Brown and Black [the socially conscious alternative to the mainstream school paper] to MCing the Office of Multicultural Affairs OMAR Awards.

Krit & Shalena Representing Grad Students @ The MLK Celebrations Opening Ceremony

Krit & Shalena @ The MLK Week Opening Ceremony

Men Of Color Alliance/PAC

Men Of Color Alliance/PAC

Turnt Up With The Kappas

Turnt Up With The Kappas

Brothers Of Kappa Alpha Psi @ Graduation

Brothers Of Kappa Alpha Psi @ Graduation

Donning The Kente Cloth

Donning Of The Kente

Mean Mugging @ The Probate

Mean Mugging @ The Probate

Protesting

Protesting

Welcome Ceremony [Ghana]

Welcome Ceremony [Ghana]

Krit & Ilyasah Shabazz [Daughter Of Malcolm X]

Krit & Ilyasah Shabazz [Daughter Of Malcolm X]

I even started my own weekly mentoring programme at Lehigh targeting black and latino students called ‘Talanoa’ [the word used in Samoa and other islands for ‘talk’ or ‘discussion’] and initiated the first Black History Month speech competition at Lourdes University.

Professor Kashi Johnson Speaking @ Talanoa

Professor Kashi Johnson @ Talanoa [Lehigh University]

BJ Speaking @ Talanoa

BJ @ Talanoa [Lehigh University]

Presenting The Awards To The Black History Month Speech Competition @ Lourdes

The First Black History Month Speech Competition Winners [Lourdes University]

I had a blast.  Now that I’m back, every now and then I feel like I’m missing out a little but then I remember my friends are still there.  We talk all the time and I’ll see them soon enough.  Next month, Leilani‘s coming to town!  My first visitor.  A sister with a Samoan name but named after a Puerto Rican.  I’m too excited.  Now I won’t be alone in jamming/bodyrolling while I’m driving with the volume turned all the way up, playing 80s/90s bops noone listens to anymore.  Foolery aside, I’ve established a link that’s had a significant impact on my life and I’m thankful for it!  Shout out to my brothers and sisters.

The Most Serious/Scariest Paintball Joint In The World

The Most Serious/Scariest Paintball Joint In The World

Krit, Angie, Claudio & Mo

Krit, Angie, Claudio & Mo

Tenny, Khaleel, Krit, Greg & Sean @ Lehigh-Lafayette

Tenny, Khaleel, Krit, Greg & Sean @ Lehigh-Lafayette

Leilani, Krit, Mikael & Kristin Turnt All The Way Up

Leilani, Krit, Mikael & Kristin Turnt All The Way Up

Tone, Court, Krit & Tang

Tone, Court, Krit & Tang

I miss black people.

14 thoughts on “The Brown & Black

  1. Bro as always love the read!! Keep on keeping! Def coming up for a visit when you go back to establish your career lol, I want front row seats homie lol! Jokes – always read between the lines and imagine so vividly these experiences of yours! Truly inspiring. Respect and alofas from Sydney homie

  2. I enjoyed reading this. I understood where you were coming from always but it’s good to hear you articulate the actual life experience behind it all. You know me, I have a lot to say but I will keep it simple. Lol can’t wait for next month either. 🙂

  3. Awwww Krit, this was so thoughtful, warm and enlightening. You’ll always be my brother from another mother. Black, brown or Samoan, we all started from the bottom and now we’re here!!!

  4. I made your article twice! HaHa! But this was an awesome article! I always knew you had something for your
    brown-skinned people! LoL.

    But in all seriousness, this article is amazing and I thank you for writing it. I didn’t realize that you identified with us so much that you actually had similar experiences where you come from. See you in Boston soon!

    • S’ak pasé! You’re welcome and thanks for reading g. Looking forward to finally making it out there. Can do another analysis of everyone at Lehigh till 0700 in the morning – that whole session had me DYING.

  5. That just took “people watching” to a whole new level. 🙂 Good on you Kiwi! If I think about it, I have had the same journey 10 years ago in Europe (reverse your study to Ws) ;-P

  6. What an amazing and inspiring journey you’re on! What began as a click to simply investigate where my friends were eating dessert tonight in Auckland has – after a few more clicks – resulted in me unexpectedly reading your blog and I have to say I’m grateful to have stumbled across it. It’s so refreshing to read something truly stimulating (which still cracks me up in the process) from a young Poly brother who is not only doing wonderful work, but sharing the stories to ignite that spark in others. Officially a fan and look forward to reading more 🙂

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